Fruited Sally Lunn

Sally Lunn 1 Fruited Sally Lunn

Before no knead bread-mania hit the internets there was Sally Lunn, a sticky batter bread with origins in Bath, England. Sally is rich and buttery, and requires only 3 hours’ rest on the countertop, compared with no-knead’s 18-24. She’s fast and easy.

Sally Lunn 6  Fruited Sally Lunn

It’s a sticky, shaggy dough; not a batter in the quickbread sense, but gooey enough that you couldn’t knead it if you tried. (Don’t go adding more flour – it’s supposed to look like this.)

Sally Lunn 5 Fruited Sally Lunn
Sally Lunn 3 Fruited Sally Lunn

I decided on this maiden voyage to add cinnamon, candied citron and a handful of currants. And a few glace cherries that were going nowhere fast in the pantry. The goal: to make Sally Lunn taste like a big hot crossed bun. You could use any kind of dried or candied fruit; chopped dried apricots, cranberries, cherries, figs – whatever you think. Or just raisins. Or nothing at all – naked Sally Lunn.

Sally Lunn 2 Fruited Sally Lunn

The batter is baked in a round cake pan – the kind you’d use for an angel cake. This keeps it from sinking in the middle, and you can then cut ever so slightly wedged slices. A loaf baked in such a large pan makes perfectly sized slices, but lots of them – it’s like two loaves in one.

Sally Lunn sliced Fruited Sally Lunn

Next time I’ll try a savoury Sally, with a handful of grated cheese and a few sprigs of fresh herbs, or add nothing and see how she fares as sandwich bread. Until then I have a tidy stash of sweet slices in the freezer, destined to be toast.

Sally Lunn toasted Fruited Sally Lunn

Fruited Sally Lunn

1 cup milk, warmed
1 cup warm water
3 large eggs
1/3 cup sugar
1/4 cup butter, softened or melted
2 tsp. active dry yeast (or 1 pkg.)
4 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 tsp. cinnamon
1 tsp. salt
1/2 cup currants or raisins
1/2 cup dried cranberries, cherries and/or candied citron

In a large bowl, whisk together the milk, water, eggs, sugar, butter and yeast; set aside for a few minutes, then whisk again. Stir in 4 cups of the flour along with the cinnamon and salt. Cover the sticky dough with a towel and set aside in a warm place for an hour.

Stir in the remaining half cup of flour along with the dried or candied fruit. Butter or spray a 9-inch tube pan and scrape the batter evenly into the pan; cover with a towel and let rise for another hour or two.

Preheat the oven to 350F. Bake the Sally Lunn for 40-45 minutes, or until puffed and deep golden. Run a thin knife around the edge of the pan, then invert it and remove the sides and bottom. Slice and serve warm, with butter.

pixel Fruited Sally Lunn
button print gry20 Fruited Sally Lunn

March 29 2013 10:42 am | bread

13 Responses to “Fruited Sally Lunn”

  1. Avery on 29 Mar 2013 at 1:53 pm #

    I am definitely NOT a fan of fruitcake in any form (even though I’ll admit that toast looks great), but the idea of making this savoury has got my attention. What a great idea for a potluck or picnic!!

  2. Laurie from Burnaby on 29 Mar 2013 at 2:20 pm #

    I used to buy Sally Lunns with a white icing – I remembered the taste, now, which I had forgotten. They used to be a long flat loaf, sticky and luscious with a bit of candied fruit in them – raisins and orange peel and some kind of green things. Lovely. My mother could never make them, but every once in a while she’d buy one, slice it, and serve it with butter.
    Lovely
    Thank you, Julie
    :)

  3. Smorgasbord | itsfrenchfor on 29 Mar 2013 at 4:08 pm #

    […] want to eat Sally Lunn, toasted, with butter, and a cup of tea. All day, […]

  4. Doréus on 29 Mar 2013 at 11:35 pm #

    I had to try it (and gave you credit for it. However, as Hubby does not care for candied or dried fruit, I substituted chocolate chips. Maybe not quite right for Good Friday, but I’ve done worse (like feeding a very willing bishop some brown sugar fudge on Good Friday during a retreat). Thanks for sharing, because this is delicious.

  5. Fruited Sally Lunn | Fitified on 30 Mar 2013 at 3:36 pm #

    […] post Fruited Sally Lunn appeared first on Dinner With […]

  6. kickpleat on 31 Mar 2013 at 12:49 pm #

    Julie, I want to eat this right this minute!! I love this :)

  7. Fiona on 02 Apr 2013 at 10:55 am #

    I missed this last week or I’d have made it. If you ever go to Bath (maybe you’ve been?) you do have to stop at the Sally Lunn bakery. They stick a cube of sugar in the bottom of the bun. And you can order them with clotted cream and jam.

  8. Julie on 02 Apr 2013 at 11:45 am #

    Yes, I went to Bath about 20 years ago. At the time I was unaware of the Sally Lunn.. I’ll have to go back!

  9. Kim on 07 Apr 2013 at 8:25 pm #

    It looks amazing and delicious. I’m not keen on fruity bits so maybe I’ll love the savoury one with cheese and bacon… Thanks for sharing.

  10. AteGood on 11 Apr 2013 at 6:39 am #

    Looks amazing! :)

  11. Mary Ann on 12 Apr 2013 at 10:16 am #

    I made a savoury version last night for our Friday soup at work! I replaced 1C flour with fine cornmeal and increased the remaining flour by 1/2C to account for the fat in the Cheddar cheese. I also subbed cumin for the cinnamon and included sun-dried tomatoes and chopped pickled hot peppers (didn’t have jalepenos). It’s quite a hit – paired with a Lentil & Roasted Garlic soup (Lipton dry mix)though I’m not sure how it would stand up as a sandwich. Thanks for the inspiration!

  12. Crystal Reynolds on 08 Aug 2013 at 8:38 pm #

    Gave it a go – loved it. For one who sucks at making bread – this is a nice treat to bake something that makes the house sound tasty.

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